Processes affecting radiometric dating techniques

As explained by physicist Walt Pasedag, radiometric dating uses the principle of radioactive decay, a physical process which can be measured with great precision.

Radioactive decay is described by a simple mathematical relationship, which states that the amount of a specific isotope that remains in a sample declines exponentially with time, according to a fixed rate constant, the "decay constant" which is unique for the isotope.

And we talk about the word isotope in the chemistry playlist. But this number up here can change depending on the number of neutrons you have. And every now and then-- and let's just be clear-- this isn't like a typical reaction. So instead of seven protons we now have six protons. And a proton that's just flying around, you could call that hydrogen 1. If it doesn't gain an electron, it's just a hydrogen ion, a positive ion, either way, or a hydrogen nucleus. And so this carbon-14, it's constantly being formed. I've just explained a mechanism where some of our body, even though carbon-12 is the most common isotope, some of our body, while we're living, gets made up of this carbon-14 thing.

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Continue reading The acceptance of radiometric dating has had a major influence on people's willingness to accept the theory of evolution.

Most people feel that radiometric dating, having a reputation for scientific respectability, proves that the earth is many millions of years old, thus providing the time framework required for the theory of evolution to have plausibility.

He calculated the modern rate of salt delivery to the oceans, and suggested that the present salinity of ocean water would take at least 100 million years to develop.

In the 1860's, English physicist Lord Kelvin disagreed with Charles Lyells proposition that the earth behaves in a uniform, unchanging manner.

What I want to do in this video is kind of introduce you to the idea of, one, how carbon-14 comes about, and how it gets into all living things. They can also be alpha particles, which is the same thing as a helium nucleus. And they're going to come in, and they're going to bump into things in our atmosphere, and they're actually going to form neutrons. And we'll show a neutron with a lowercase n, and a 1 for its mass number. And what's interesting about this is this is constantly being formed in our atmosphere, not in huge quantities, but in reasonable quantities. Because as soon as you die and you get buried under the ground, there's no way for the carbon-14 to become part of your tissue anymore because you're not eating anything with new carbon-14.

And then either later in this video or in future videos we'll talk about how it's actually used to date things, how we use it actually figure out that that bone is 12,000 years old, or that person died 18,000 years ago, whatever it might be. So let me just draw the surface of the Earth like that. So then you have the Earth's atmosphere right over here. And 78%, the most abundant element in our atmosphere is nitrogen. And we don't write anything, because it has no protons down here. And what's interesting here is once you die, you're not going to get any new carbon-14. You can't just say all the carbon-14's on the left are going to decay and all the carbon-14's on the right aren't going to decay in that 5,730 years.

We note that at the instant the swimmer touches the edge of the pool our wristwatch reads and 53 seconds.

How long has the competitor taken to swim the 1,500 metre race?

Strata Thickness- In the late 1800s, a British geologist estimated that 75 million years has lapsed since the beginning of the Cambrian.

This estimate was based upon the maximum known thickness of strata (from Cambrian to present) divided by the average rate of sedimentation in modern environments. Joly used the salinity of ocean water to determine the age of the earth.

Mountains, erosion, and variations in climate were considered to be punishment for the sins committed by humanity.