Boys victims dating violence

"Parents and pediatricians may underestimate how common dating violence is, and how often boys are victims," said Swahn, who was not involved in the study. But the new study conflicts with those findings, said lead researcher Dennis Reidy, of the division of violence prevention at the U. Regardless, he added, the study points out that boys can be victims, too.

"We don't want to get locked into the mindset that boys are always the perpetrators and girls are always the victims," Reidy said.

Overall, almost 11 percent of boys said they'd been physically abused by a dating partner at least three times.

The researchers also asked about psychological and emotional abuse — like being yelled at, threatened or called names.Overall, almost 11 percent of boys said they’d been physically abused by a dating partner at least three times.The pattern was also corroborated by girls' reports: They commonly admitted to being perpetrators."We don't want to get locked into the mindset that boys are always the perpetrators and girls are always the victims," Reidy said.Researchers don’t know if any of these events causes the others, however.

While it’s possible that dating violence could cause thoughts of suicide, it’s also possible that children who are depressed are more likely than others to fall into abusive relationships, says Adiaha Spinks-Franklin,​ a developmental and behavioral pediatrician at Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston who was not involved in the new study.

They were asked not only about physical abuse, but also how often they'd been sexually victimized -- including having a boyfriend or girlfriend pressure them to have sex, or spread "sexual rumors" about them.

Overall, almost 11 percent of boys said they'd been physically abused by a dating partner at least three times.

Contrary to what many people may think, teenage boys commonly suffer dating violence — including physical and emotional abuse, a new U. It turned out that boys were about as likely as girls to say they’d been victims of some form of dating violence.

The study focused on teens considered to be at high risk for dating violence — those who had suffered or witnessed violence at home or in their neighborhoods.

“Parents and pediatricians may underestimate how common dating violence is, and how often boys are victims,” said Swahn, who was not involved in the study. But the new study conflicts with those findings, said lead researcher Dennis Reidy, of the division of violence prevention at the U. Regardless, he added, the study points out that boys can be victims, too.